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Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Archbishop justifies desecration

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Filipino Catholic Church officials came to defense of this, saying the Masses, particularly at Luneta, were “extraordinary” circumstances. In an interview with GMA News, Lingayen-Dagupan Archbishop Socrates Villegas, president of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP), said: “Under normal circumstances, hindi dapat mangyari ‘yon, pero extraordinary ang situation natin sa Luneta, six million people.” He added: “Sa ganu’ng pagkakataon, kailangan nating tulungan ang isa’t isa na makatanggap ng communion.”

For his part, Fr. Francis Lucas, executive secretary of the CBCP Episcopal Commission on Social Communication and Mass Media, echoed this, telling GMA News Online: “For pastoral reasons since people can’t move during communion, mass passing of the host is okay.”

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Priest banned from preaching after supporting anti-Islamisation movement

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After a speech at a Pegida (the anti-Islamisation movement founded in Germany) demonstration  the Bishop of Münster, Felix Genn has banned a Catholic priest from giving sermons. The priest could not express themselves inside and outside of places of worship in the name of the church, the diocese said on Tuesday.  



The priest from the Lower Rhine had spread stereotypes about Islam in Duisburg on Monday evening. In addition, he had criticized the lighting of the cathedral being turned off during a Pegida rally in Cologne in early January. In the Diocese, the 67-year-old takes almost no services anymore.
The priest  made his statements, for which he was abusing his authority as pastor and priest, "the foundations of right-wing ideologies, for xenophobia and a conflict of religions  have no placein the Roman Catholic Church," said the diocese.



Bishop Genn informed the 67-year-old in writing that he "cannot and will not tolerate"  such talk.
 
According to the diocese, the priest had criticised the darkening of Cologne Cathedral - a highly acclaimed protest against Pegida - as "very sad" . The light had only been shut down "because people had come together peacefully and taken a stand against the Islamization of Europe in silent protest," the priest was quoted as saying. In Mid-December Bamberg Archbishop Ludwig Schick had said. "Christians must not take part in Pegida" The chairman of the German Bishops' Conference, Cardinal Reinhard Marx of Munich, had subsequently made clear that there were no "ecclesiastical directives" on this matter for Catholics.



 
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Cardinal Schönborn criticises Charlie Hebdo

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Schönborn criticizes "vulgar caricatures"
The Archbishop of Vienna, Christoph Cardinal Schönborn had criticized the French satirical magazine "Charlie Hebdo", which in the past week has been the victim of a terrorist attack. 

"'Charlie Hebdo' did not hesitate, over many years, in addition to humorous and satirical cartoons of a political nature to present especially Christianity and Islam in contempt-making and vulgar caricatures," Schönborn wrote on Friday in his column in the free newspaper "Heute". 

In the context, the cardinal points to a "sad story of hate-filled cartoons" in Austria in the late 19th century. "I think of the hateful anti-Semitic caricatures," said the cardinal in his weekly "Heute" column. "This poisonous seed has sprouted and has contributed to the mass murder of the Jews. If there had been significant steps against this incitement, perhaps much suffering and terrible guilt would have been avoided." 

"Yardstick" of freedom for speech, the press and religion 

According to the Cardinal, there are limits to the freedom of expression, the press and religion. Namely "where it comes to respect for what to the other is sacred." At the same time, Schönborn designated cartoonists as a "barometer" of freedom of speech, the press and religion, calling those freedoms as "fundamental freedoms in a good and open society".
The attacks in Paris has emphasised again the value of these. Despite his judgment about the cartoons in the satirical magazine, nothing could justify "violence against 'Charlie Hebdo'"

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